UP Board syllabus Class 12
UP Board master chapter 7 Class 12th Questions on Paras
BoardUP Board
Text bookNCERT
Class 12th
SubjectEnglish
Chapter Chapter 7
Chapter nameTHE HERITAGE OF INDIA
Chapter Number Number 4 Comprehension Questions on Paras
CategoryEnglish PROSE Class 12th

Q. Read the following and answer the questions given below:

(1) Ram Mohan Roy had sounded the theme with his passionate advocacy of social reform; Vivekanand repeated it with a more nationalist timbre, when he declared that the highest form of service of the Great Mother was social service. Other great Indians, chief of whom was Mahatma Gandhi. developed the theme of
social service as a religious duty, and the development continues under Gandhi’s successors.

Questions:
  1. What did Ram Mohan Roy adovcate?
  2. What according to Vivekanand was highest form of service of the Great Mother?
  3. “Vivekanand repeated it with a nationalist timbre. What does this sustest?
  4. What do you understand by “social service as a religious duty” ?
Answers:
  1. Ram Mohan Roy advocated social reform.
  2. According to Vivekanand social service was the highest form of service of the Great Mother
  3. This statement suggests that when Vivekanand talked of social service le thought of nationalism also. He wanted to see India a great nation.
  4. This phrase means that a person should do some service.

(2) Mahatma Gandhi was looked on by many, both Indian and European, as the epitome of Hindu tradition, but this is a false judgement for he was much influenced by Western ideas. Gandhi believed in the fundamentals of his ancient culture, but his passionate love of the underdog and his antipathy to caste though not unprecedented in ancient India, were unorthodox in the extreme, and owed more to Puropean 19th century liberalism than to anything Indian. His faith in
non-violence was, as we have seen, by no means typical of Hinduism–his predecessor in revolt, the able Maratha Brahman B.G. Tilak, and Gandhi’s impatient lieutenant Subhas Chandra Bose, were far more orthodox in this respect. For Gandhi’s pacifism we must look to the Sermon on the Mount and to Tolstoy

Questions:
  1. What false notion about Mahatma Gandhi is held by many Indians and Europeans, according to the writer ?
  2. What was Gandhi’s attitude towards Indian culture ?
  3. What did Gandhi owe to the 19th century liberalism of Europe ?
  4. Why does the writer say that Gandhi’s faith in non-violence was by no means typical of Hinduism?
Answers:
  1. According to the writer many Indians and Europeans held the false notion that Gandhi was the epitome of Hindu tradition.
  2. Gandhi’s attitude towards Indian culture was that he believed in the fundamentals of ancient Indian culture..
  3. Gandhi owed more to European 19th century liberalism than anything Indian
  4. The writer says that Gandhi’s faith in non-violence was by no means typical of Hinduism because R.G. Tilak and Subhash Chandra Bose were far more or thodox in this respect.

(3) But it is safe to predict that, whatever the future may be, the Indians of coming generations will not be unconvincing and self-conscious copies of
Europeans, but will be men rooted in their traditions, and aware of the continuity of their culture. Already, after only seven years of Independence, the extremes of
national self-denigration and fanatical cultural chauvinism are disappearing. We believe that Hindu civilization is in the act of performing its most spectacular feat of synthesis.

Questions:
  1. What vision does the writer have about the future generations of India ?
  2. How do the Indians look as copies of Europeans ?
  3. What is the most striking achievement of the Hindu civilization?
  4. What are the two undesirable extremes of the Indian culture?
Answers:

  1. The future generations of India will not be unconvincing and self- conscious copies of Europeans.
  2. The Indians look as copies of Europeans in the matter of self-conscious- ness.
  3. Hindu civilization is in the act of performing its most spectacular feat of synthesis.
  4. The two undesirable extremes of the Indian culture are self denigration and fanatical cultural chauvinism.

(4) Hindu civilization will, we believe, retain its continuity. The Bhagavad Gita will not cease to inspire men of action, and the Upanishads men of thought. The charm and graciousness of the Indian way of life will continue, however much affected it may be by the labour-saving devices of the West.

Questions:
  1. What is the author’s opinion about the future of Hindu civilization?
  2. Who does the ‘Bhagavad Gita’ and ‘Upanishads’ motivate?
  3. What has sustained the people of India in troubled times?
  4. How does the Indian way of life differ that of the West ?
Answers:
  1. According to the author Hindu civilization will retain its continuity.
  2. The Bhagavad Gita and Upanishads will motivate men of action and thought
  3. The charm and graciousness has sustained the people of India in troubled times.
  4. Indian way of life differs by the labour-saving devices of the West.

(5) In buses and trains all over India Brahmans rub shoulders with the lowest castes without consciousness of grave pollution, and the temples are open to all by law. Caste is vanishing the process began long ago, but its pace is now so rapid that the more objectionable features of caste may have disappeared within a
generation or so. The old family system is adapting itself to present-day conditions. In fact the whole face of India is altering, but the cultural tradition continues, and
it will never be lost.

Questions:
  1. What goes to prove that caste is disappearing fast in India ?
  2. How is the old family system adapting itself to the present day needs?
    3.How can you say that the whole face of India is altering? Give a few examples.
  3. What goes to prove that India still maintains the continuity of her cultural heritage and will continue to do so ?
Answers:
  1. Brahmans rub shoulders with the lowest classes and do not feel polluted. The temples are open to all by law.
  2. There is no joint family system now, and one man is not the head of the family. The family is divided into groups according to the occupation of each other.
  3. Customs are changing. Food habits entertainment and working conditions are changing
  4. Now social life is changing but some customs and habits are the same
UP Board Syllabus Chapter 7 Class 12th English (Prose)
NumberChapter Number
1UP Board syllabus Chapter 7 Class 12th THE HORSE
2UP Board syllabus Chapter 7 Class 12th Summary of the Lesson
3UP Board syllabus Chapter 7 Class 12 Explanation
4UP Board syllabus chapter 7 Class 12 Comprehension
5UP board syllabus chapter 7 Class 12 Short Questions Answer
6UP board syllabus chapter 7 Class 12 Long Questions Answer
7UP board syllabus chapter 7 Class 12 FILL IN THE BLANKS

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